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X-ray

Radiography

X-rays are a type of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. An x-ray machine sends individual x-ray particles through the body. The images are recorded on a computer or film. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to...

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  • X-ray

    X-ray

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on film. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will appear white, air will be black, and other structures will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other diseases, especially when coupled with the use of barium and air contrast within the bowel.

    X-ray

    illustration

  • X-ray

    X-ray

    X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight areas of the body) will also appear white. Structures containing air will be black and muscle, fat, and fluid will appear as shades of gray.

    X-ray

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    This is an angiogram of the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the carotid fork. There is enlargement of the artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed segment toward the bottom of the picture.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    illustration

  • Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

    Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

    This abdominal X-ray shows a stomach filled with fluid and a swollen (distended) small bowel, caused by a blockage (pseudo-obstruction) in the intestines. A solution containing a dye (barium) that is visible on X-rays was swallowed by the patient (upper GI series).

    Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

    illustration

  • Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

    Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying size that run together (coalesce). Arrows indicate the location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities are located in the upper area of the lungs toward the back. The appearance is typical for chronic pulmonary tuberculosis but may also occur with chronic pulmonary histiocytosis and chronic pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Pulmonary tuberculosis is making a comeback with new resistant strains that are difficult to treat. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common form of the disease, but other organs can be infected.

    Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

    illustration

  • Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

    Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

    This x-ray of the skull shows an eosinophilic granuloma (a lesion made-up of a type of white blood cell). This condition can range from a single eosinophilic granuloma to massive infiltration of skin, bone, and body organs.

    Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    A carotid arteriogram is an x-ray study designed to determine if there is narrowing or other abnormality in the carotid artery, a main artery to the brain. This is an angiogram of the left common carotid artery (both front-to-back and side views) showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just beyond the division of the common carotid artery into the internal and external branches.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    illustration

  • Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

    Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

    Basal cell carcinomas are more prevalent on sun or radiation exposed areas of skin. Here the typical lesion with raised, rolled, pearly borders with ulcerated center is seen on the back of a person previously irradiated for acne.

    Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

    illustration

  • Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

    Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

    This abdominal x-ray shows thickening of the bowel wall and swelling (distention) caused by a blockage (pseudo-obstruction) in the intestines. A solution containing a dye (barium), which is visible on X-ray, was swallowed by the patient (the procedure is known as an upper GI series).

    Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

    illustration

  • Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

    Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

    This chest x-ray shows coal worker's lungs. There are diffuse, small, light areas on both sides (1 to 3 mm) in all parts of the lungs. Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - stage I, simple silicosis, miliary tuberculosis, histiocytosis X (eosinophilic granuloma), and other diffuse infiltrate pulmonary diseases.

    Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

    illustration

    • X-ray

      X-ray

      X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on film. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will appear white, air will be black, and other structures will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other diseases, especially when coupled with the use of barium and air contrast within the bowel.

      X-ray

      illustration

    • X-ray

      X-ray

      X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight areas of the body) will also appear white. Structures containing air will be black and muscle, fat, and fluid will appear as shades of gray.

      X-ray

      illustration

    • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

      Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

      This is an angiogram of the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the carotid fork. There is enlargement of the artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed segment toward the bottom of the picture.

      Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

      illustration

    • Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

      Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

      This abdominal X-ray shows a stomach filled with fluid and a swollen (distended) small bowel, caused by a blockage (pseudo-obstruction) in the intestines. A solution containing a dye (barium) that is visible on X-rays was swallowed by the patient (upper GI series).

      Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach

      illustration

    • Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

      Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

      Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying size that run together (coalesce). Arrows indicate the location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities are located in the upper area of the lungs toward the back. The appearance is typical for chronic pulmonary tuberculosis but may also occur with chronic pulmonary histiocytosis and chronic pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Pulmonary tuberculosis is making a comeback with new resistant strains that are difficult to treat. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common form of the disease, but other organs can be infected.

      Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays

      illustration

    • Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

      Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

      This x-ray of the skull shows an eosinophilic granuloma (a lesion made-up of a type of white blood cell). This condition can range from a single eosinophilic granuloma to massive infiltration of skin, bone, and body organs.

      Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull

      illustration

    • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

      Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

      A carotid arteriogram is an x-ray study designed to determine if there is narrowing or other abnormality in the carotid artery, a main artery to the brain. This is an angiogram of the left common carotid artery (both front-to-back and side views) showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just beyond the division of the common carotid artery into the internal and external branches.

      Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

      illustration

    • Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

      Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

      Basal cell carcinomas are more prevalent on sun or radiation exposed areas of skin. Here the typical lesion with raised, rolled, pearly borders with ulcerated center is seen on the back of a person previously irradiated for acne.

      Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne

      illustration

    • Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

      Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

      This abdominal x-ray shows thickening of the bowel wall and swelling (distention) caused by a blockage (pseudo-obstruction) in the intestines. A solution containing a dye (barium), which is visible on X-ray, was swallowed by the patient (the procedure is known as an upper GI series).

      Ileus - x-ray of bowel distension

      illustration

    • Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

      Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

      This chest x-ray shows coal worker's lungs. There are diffuse, small, light areas on both sides (1 to 3 mm) in all parts of the lungs. Diseases that may result in an x-ray like this include: simple coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) - stage I, simple silicosis, miliary tuberculosis, histiocytosis X (eosinophilic granuloma), and other diffuse infiltrate pulmonary diseases.

      Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray

      illustration

    Review Date: 9/22/2016

    Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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